Afghanistan and the media

It can’t have escaped anyone’s attention that the global news cycles have – rightly – been dominated by the events in Afghanistan this last week. We’ll take a look here at some of the media implications, but of course there are an infinite number of people better placed than me to report on the wider situation, so after that we’ll look beyond the headlines to some of the other stories that have made the media news this last week… 

Afghanistan: Media events and implications

The Atlantic: Subscriber success: Returning to more familiar waters and we reported success last week for The Atlantic, which added 280,000 subscribers in a year. Covering the first half of 2021, the company’s latest statement filed with the Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) reports a total circulation of 833,410, representing the highest in the publication’s 164 year history.

In a note to staff, Editor-in-Chief, Jeffrey Goldberg and CEO, Nicholas Thompson, wrote: ‘The Atlantic is one of AAM’s oldest clients—we first filed with them in 1916, when we reported having roughly 70,000 subscribers. A more immediately relevant statistic: Two years ago, we reported 474,274 in total circulation. In the first half of 2020, we grew to a total of 552,242.’

Future buys Dennis: Staying in the world of magazine media, and there was more big news last week as Future acquired Dennis for £300m. The deal moves leading wealth, knowledge, and B2B brands across to the Future portfolio. Tweeting about the move, Future said: ‘We’re excited to announce the acquisition of Dennis, bolstering our Wealth, Knowledge and B2B Technology verticals and further enhancing our audience in North America. We look forward to welcoming the new brands on board.’ Full story here.

Apple not returning to offices: Apple has delayed its return to corporate offices until 2022 as Covid cases rise, reports the Guardian. This applies not only in the US but to international workforces as well, with workers being told that they will not return to corporate offices until January at the earliest. It’s the latest in a series of high-profile company announcements relating to delaying office return, with Microsoft, Amazon, and Uber all recently saying similar things. Stores will remain open.

You can read the full article on the FIPP website here.